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IT’S THE PROSECUTORS WHO SHOULD BE PROSECUTED

There was anger, anguish and incredulity in the fever swamps this week when Special Prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald make it clear he would not indict White House political guru Karl Rove in his apparently endless investigation of the outing of CIA officer Valerie Plame.

This should remind us the greater threat to our civil liberties comes not from the measures the Bush administration has taken to protect us from terrorists, but from prosecutors who abuse their power for political purposes.

Liberals wanted Rove indicted only because he is a skilled political adversary.  The interest among liberals in an indictment of the person who actually told columnist Robert Novak about Ms. Plame (thought to be former deputy secretary of state Richard Armitage) is zero, because there would be no political gain from it.

Their efforts to criminalize policy differences stem from two related beliefs, both inimical to democracy.

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DOWNHILL FOR AL QAEDA, A DOWNER FOR THE LEFT

Zarqawi's death is a huge psychological and political boost to the fledgling Iraqi government.  Iraqis danced in the streets.  Prime Minister Nouri al Maliki pushed through a parliament giddy at the news his choices for the critical ministries of defense and interior (which is in charge of the police), finally completing formation of his government.

Zarqawi's legendary brutality had made many Iraqis fearful of cooperating with their government.  Now that he is dead, what has been a stream of tips could become a river.

Things will now get much worse for al Qaeda.  Thanks to leads from "a treasure trove" of documents recovered from the rubble, Coalition forces launched 17 raids in greater Baghdad Thursday.

While Iraqis celebrated, news of the demise of the murderous thug was greeted sourly on the left-liberal blogs Democratic Underground and Daily Kos, where posters feared Zarqawi's death would boost support for President Bush and the Iraq war.

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THE FRAUD OF THE ANTI-WAR LEFT

Jesse Macbeth, a self-styled "special forces ranger," regaled moonbat audiences with tales of the atrocities he committed in Iraq:

"Fallujah is where we slaughtered people in mosques," he said.  "We would dig holes and leave mass graves of children, women and old men."

Unfortunately for Mr. Macbeth, he made a video which was seen by actual veterans. In it, he is wearing his beret improperly ("like a pastry chef," said an Army spokesman).  He's wearing a Ranger beret, but it has a Special Forces flash.  The sleeves on his BDU jacket are rolled up the way the Marines do it; not the Army. 

And there is no such thing as a "special forces ranger."  The "Green Beret" Special Forces and the Rangers are two distinct Army units.

In short, Mr. Macbeth was a fraud so obvious even the moonbats should have seen through him, but they didn't because they wanted so badly to believe the terrible things he was saying about U.S. forces in Iraq. 

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CONGRESS: OUT OF TOUCH AND ABOVE THE LAW

A rare bipartisan unity was achieved in the House of Representatives this week.  What was it that brought lawmakers together?  A determination to win the war on terror?  A plan to secure our borders?  A compromise to save Social Security from bankruptcy?

Nah.  Democratic and Republican leaders in the House joined together to protest the search the FBI made last weekend of the offices of Rep. William Jefferson (D-La), who is under investigation for allegedly accepting a bribe from a Kentucky businessman.

Partisan differences are set aside when (and apparently only when) the privileges of lawmakers are threatened.

One would imagine that in the wake of the Duke Cunningham and Jack Abramoff scandals, the GOP would be grateful for the attention devoted to Mr. Jefferson, because his case, and that of Rep. Alan Mollohan (D-WVa), make Democratic denunciations of the "Republican culture of corruption" seem a case of the pot calling the kettle black.

But one would be wrong. 

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REPORTING PHONY NEWS IN AMERICA, REFUSING TO REPORT REAL NEWS IN IRAQ

Because it dominated the news this past weekend, many Americans are aware of the USA Today story May 11 revealing that the National Security Agency has established a data base containing the records of telephone calls made by tens of millions of Americans.

Not so many Americans are aware that USA Today's "scoop" is recycled news.  The New York Times ran a story on the NSA database last December.  It was treated then with the ho hum response it so richly deserves.

Cynics note the recycling occurred on the eve of Senate hearings on the nomination of Gen. Michael Hayden -- who as head of the NSA established the data mining program -- to be director of the CIA.  Could the leakers and the journalists going bananas over the recycled revelation be trying to sidetrack his nomination?

Whatever the reason, the contrast between the ink and air time given the NSA telephone number database rehash and the inattention given a startling al Qaeda document captured in Iraq could not be greater.

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THE PRISON DREAM TEAM

Will Mary McCarthy and Dana Priest end up sharing a jail cell?

The CIA announced Friday it has fired a senior analyst for leaking classified information to the news media.

After she failed a polygraph examination, Mary McCarthy confessed to leaking to Dana Priest of the Washington Post information about secret CIA prisons for al Qaeda bigwigs.  Earlier this month, Ms. Priest was awarded a Pulitzer prize for her reporting on the secret prisons.

Prison is where they both could end up.

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THE GREAT UN-COMMUNICATOR

You've got to hand it to President Bush.  For a pretty decent, straightforward guy, he sure has a knack for making enemies.

The economy is booming.  There has been no successful terrorist attack in the United States since Sept. 11, 2001.  Al Qaeda officials acknowledge we're winning the war in Iraq.  Yet in the history of polling, only three presidents have had job approval ratings as low or lower than President Bush does now.

They were Richard Nixon and Jimmy Carter just before they left office, and Harry Truman after he had fired Gen. Douglas MacArthur.  Mr. Bush is about where Mr. Carter was (34 percent), but still has a ways to fall to reach the nadirs of Nixon (24 percent) and Truman (23 percent).  Will he?

The president's popularity problem isn't one problem, but three.

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THE FAT LADY IS WARMING UP FOR AL QAEDA IN IRAQ

Abu Musab al Zarqawi, the al Qaeda chieftain in Iraq (or maybe not, see below) is changing tactics, says London's Sunday Times (4/30).

Mr. Zarqawi "is attempting to set up his own mini-army and move away from individual suicide attacks to a more organized resistance movement," writes Michael Smith.

Col. John Gronski of the Pennsylvania Army National Guard indicated Monday (5/1) why the change in tactics isn't such a good idea.  Col. Gronski is commander of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team of the Pennsylvania Guard's 28th Infantry Division, stationed in Ar Ramadi.

Iraqi troops supported by Col. Gronski's soldiers killed more than 100 insurgents in a battle last week, Col. Gronski told CNN.  Two Iraqi soldiers died in the battle.  No Americans were killed.

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REVOLTING GENERALS

In every army, there are (a few) Grants and (many) McClellans. The key to success in war is to find and promote the Grants. Keep this in mind as you examine what Time magazine calls the "Revolt of the Generals."

Six retired Army and Marine generals have called for the resignation of Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld.  There are about 4,700 retired flag officers. For every general speaking out against Secretary Rumsfeld, there are more than 780 who are not.

The generals speaking out may have reasons other than patriotism for doing so. Gen. Zinni is flogging a book. MajGen. John Riggs was busted a grade and forced to retire because of a procurement scandal. MajGen. Eaton oversaw the rebuilding of the Iraqi army in 2003-2004, when everyone now agrees this was a disaster.

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CONTEMPT OF TRUTH

My friend Bill Roggio, an Army veteran and Web logger who was embedded with U.S. Marines in Iraq last fall, was a guest this week on a segment of the CNN show "On the Story."  The topic was news coverage from Iraq.

"On the Story" gets even lower ratings than the average CNN show, so there's a question of how representative of American public opinion audience reaction is.  But before the segment with Bill began, host Ali Velshi conducted a little poll.

"Give me a show of hands if you have confidence in the news coming out of Iraq," Mr. Velshi asked the studio audience.  "It looks like about 30 percent of you."

"Let's see a show of hands of those of you who don't have confidence like (Defense Secretary) Donald Rumsfeld says," he asked.  "That looks like 90 percent of you."

Mr. Roggio responded by giving the media a D+.  "Reporting often is inaccurate, usually lacks context, often aids al Qaeda, and is why Americans like those in the audience have been so misinformed."

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